BLACK+GRAY Motorcycle Transport Recommendations

Motorcycle Transport Recommendations


 Motorcycle Transport Quick Tips(.pdf file)

 Spyder Transport Recommendations(.pdf file)

A STEP BY STEP

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With the trailer planned for the best arrangement of motorcycles, BLACK+GRAY Aluminum Wheel Chocks or Plastic Wheel Chocks securely installed and enough BLACK+GRAY Ultimax Tie-Down Anchors positioned for the planned number tie-down strap attachments…the trailer is ready for loading.


  • Always check the plan with a "dry-run" of your bike load sequence well in advance of your trip.
  • Always inspect all transport components before loading: Wheel Chocks, Tie-Down Straps and Tie-Down Anchors.
  • Always inspect the mounting surfaces surrounding any tie-down anchors for any signs of material stress, hardware loosening or potential failure.
  • Before loading, be sure that the trailer is firmly attached to the tow vehicle and that the coupler is latched, wheels chocked, and if available, the stabilizer jacks are lowered and that the trailer is secure from movement.
  • If loading ramps are used, secure the ramp to the truck or trailer to prevent movement with a tie-down strap, pin arrangement, clamp, etc.
  • Attach soft loops on the motorcycle(s) before moving on to the trailer. Be aware of wires or control cables mistakenly wrapped into the soft loop.
  • Locate and attach tie-down straps to the anchors in the trailer. Be aware of the orientation of the tie-down strap. Cam or ratchet straps can be easier to tighten if oriented one way or the other.
  • For “solo” loading, place the loose end of the rear tie-down straps in a position where they can be reached while you are sitting on the motorcycle.
  • Ride or walk the motorcycle onto the trailer. Do not try to load and tie-down a "hot" motorcycle after it has been running…ouch!
  • Be sure that the motorcycle is positioned straight in the front wheel chock and ideally, the rear wheel chock. While sitting on the motorcycle attach the rear tie-down straps to the soft loops and tighten until the bike is firmly in place and able to free-stand vertically. Optionally, placing the motorcycle in gear or “bungee-cording” the brakes “on” will limit the motorcycle's motion.
  • While off of the motorcycle, attach front tie-down straps and secure the motorcycle firmly in place. Adjust both front and rear tie-down straps so that when completed the motorcycle is in a completely upright position. Shaking the motorcycle should cause trailer motion only and very little motorcycle movement should occur.
  • Tie-off loose/free ends of tie-down straps for safety when moving about an enclosed trailer or to prevent “whipping” in the wind of an open trailer or truck.
  • Make one final check for any potential damage that can occur from the tie-down straps, hooks, cams or rackets, etc. making contact with bodywork, accessories, brake lines, control wiring/cables etc.
  • Always, when taking a rest stop and especially users of enclosed trailers, check the motorcycle(s)! Be sure nothing has shifted, loosened, fallen-off, etc.

TIPS + REMINDERS

Choose only high-quality, heavy-duty tie-down components and hardware for securing motorcycles and other cargo in open or closed trucks and trailers. The cost to repair your motorcycle will be far greater than the money saved buying transport products.

  • Always inspect all transport components before loading: Wheel Chocks, Tie-Down Straps and Tie-Down Anchors, etc...
  • Always inspect the mounting surfaces surrounding any tie-down anchors for any signs of material stress, hardware loosening or potential failure.
  • Before loading, be sure that the trailer is firmly attached to the tow vehicle and that the coupler is latched, wheels chocked and if available, the stabilizer jacks are lowered and that the trailer is secure from movement.
  • Do not try to load and tie-down a "hot" motorcycle after it has been running...ouch!
  • NEVER locate tie-down anchors or choose floor attachment points so far beyond the front edge of the front tire so that when tie-down straps are tightened, pulling the motorcycle into the chock, that the wheel chock fasteners and the wheel chock itself is in a "stressed" condition.
  • Be aware of wires or control cables mistakenly wrapped into all the soft loops placed on the motorcycle.
  • Do not tie-down any motorcycle by the handlebars/grips.
  • Do not attach soft loops or tie-downs to motorcycle accessories such as luggage or bag carriers.
  • Once attached, tie-down straps should form a 30°-45° angle between the motorcycle and floor anchors.
  • Tie-off loose/free ends of tie-down straps for safety when moving about an enclosed trailer or to prevent " whipping" in the wind of an open trailer or truck.
  • Never use a cover on a motorcycle when towing it on an open trailer. Road grit and cover fabric flapping movements remove finishes from motorcycles in a short amount of travel time.
  • Always, when taking a rest stop and especially users of enclosed trailers, check the motorcycle(s)! Be sure nothing has shifted, loosened, fallen-off, etc... you will be surprised what a few hundred miles of bumpy roads can do to a "secured" motorcycle


FRONT AND REAR ALUMINUM WHEEL CHOCKS AND PLASTIC WHEEL CHOCKS

BLACK+GRAY Plastic Wheel Chocks

When planning and designing your motorcycle trailer, consider several factors when locating your BLACK+GRAY Aluminum Wheel Chocks or Plastic Wheel Chocks, such as the position of the motorcycle(s) and how it affects weight distribution in the trailer, "tongue" weight on the tow vehicle, lateral loading on the trailer when turning, etc. Wheel Chocks need to be positioned in a correct relationship to tie-down anchors. In order to achieve the most secure arrangement when trailering a motorcycle, the distance from the motorcycle (placed in the wheel chock) to the tie-down anchors need to be such that when the tie-down straps are attached to the motorcycle and the tie-down anchors, the straps are at approximately a 30°- 45° angle. Plan for enough space in the trailer to accomplish this recommended arrangement.

When using any surface mounted wheel chocks, NEVER locate tie-down anchors or choose floor attachment points so far beyond the front edge of the front tire so that when tie-down straps are tightened, pulling the motorcycle into the chock, the wheel chock fasteners and the wheel chock itself are in a stressed condition.

BLACK+GRAY Aluminum Wheel Chocks

For any motorcycle to be safe and secure there must be a means of ensuring that the motorcycle will not move once it is tied down. The best means of accomplishing this is by preventing forward motion, preventing the front wheel from turning left to right, and using tie-down straps to pull the bike down on the suspension and forward against a wheel chock.

BLACK+GRAY Aluminum Wheel Chocks and Plastic Wheel Chocks have been designed, developed, tested and manufactured to provide significant advantages over common "bent metal tube" or homemade chocks.


  • Aluminum Wheel chocks are made from .188" thick non-corrosive powder-coated aluminum materials with stainless steel hardware.
  • The 1/4" thick plastic materials used to produce BLACK+GRAY Plastic Wheel Chocks are high-impact, UV resistant, non-corrosive and will not damage tires or brake rotors.
  • The unique design of the Front Wheel Chocks gives structure to the chock while cradling the front tire without creating interference with brake rotors. The length of the chock eliminates sideways motion, which ensures that the wheel will not jump the chock in the event of a violent jolt.
  • BLACK+GRAY offers the only "REAR" Wheel Chock available for motorcycle transport. The design of the unique rear chock is intended to prevent lateral (walking) motion that results from continuous travel impacts…aka bumps!
  • The designs of all of the Aluminum Wheel Chocks and Plastic Wheel Chocks provide material under the tire so that when the motorcycle is tied down, the wheel chock is also tied down, unlike bent tube chocks that can vibrate or become loose from jolts or impact.
  • Installation of Front and Rear Wheel Chocks is simple and secure.
  • BLACK+GRAY Quick Dis-Connect kits provide a fast and positive means of installing chocks with an easy "¼ turn" motion. Use of the optional Quick Dis-Connect kits allows for multiple loading combinations, weight distribution maintenance, and allows for removal of the chocks when the trailer is used for other cargo.

TIE-DOWN STRAPS AND SOFT LOOPS

Tie-Down Straps are offered in a variety of strap widths and construction with associated working load limits. Straps come with or without soft ties (loops sewn into the straps intended to prevent damage to paint or chrome). They also come with either ratchet or cam buckles. Ratchet tie-downs let you increase the tension on the motorcycles suspension, which in turn will reduce shock loading the straps when the trailer hits a bump. Shock loading occurs when the motorcycle's suspension compresses to absorb the shock. The tie-down straps go slack and then are snapped tight as the suspension expands.

CamSure

In selecting tie-down straps and soft loops there are three factors to consider regarding strength. The sewing, the width, and the thread count. Sewing is determined by the manufacturer. Select a reputable brand/ manufacturer and the sewing should be acceptable. Width should be the same as the tie-down straps you are using. The most important factor of strap strength is the thread count. While thread count is not shown on the box it can be determined by examining the thickness of the strap. In general, the thinner the strap material, the weaker the strap. When inspecting the straps for damage or wear, look any loose threads, broken stitches, fraying or cuts in the strap material, and replace any damaged straps immediately.

Never tie-down the motorcycle by the handlebars. On many large cruiser motorcycles, handlebars are rubber mounted and are not designed to accept the stresses that are generated in towing down rough roads or hitting potholes at speed. Attach tie-downs to the motorcycle frame or a part solidly mounted to the frame. Four tie-downs/attachment points (two at the front and two on the side) is adequate for most vintage, dirt bikes and small street motorcycles. Six tie-downs/attachment points (four at the front and two at the back) will give you the maximum amount of safety for a large motorcycle.

For touring and sport bikes, using two sets of ratchet straps with soft loops to surround the triple tree works well: one set pulling the front tire directly into the chock and the second pulling forward and out to the side. On large cruiser motorcycles with reversed forks, attach to the front of the engine where the frame meets the crash bars (if so equipped, or where it would meet the crash bars if not) and repeat the four strap tie-down described above. At the rear of the bike, attach soft loops around solidly mounted frame components like rear foot peg brackets or the rear frame of the bike itself. Evaluate each attachment point carefully to anticipate any interference with bodywork, exhaust, etc that could cause damage to either the tie-down strap or the motorcycle. Each tie-down strap should form approximately a 30°- 45° angle between the motorcycle attachment point and the tie-down anchor located the trailer floor.


TIE-DOWN ANCHORS

In order to ensure that the motorcycle will not move, secure floor anchor attachment points for tie-down straps are required. Again, there are several factors to consider when selecting a tie-down anchor: the size and weight of the motorcycle that is being transported, the estimated load capacity required for each anchor, the quality and ability of the anchor to withstand "shock loading" while in transit based on the products published load ratings, and the trailer floor surface material and anchor attachment hardware.

Once the BLACK+GRAY Plastic Wheel Chocks are installed on the trailer surface, locate each Ultimax Tie-Down Anchor in the correct relationship to wheel chocks and motorcycle. In order to achieve the most secure arrangement when trailering a motorcycle, the correct relationship/distance from the motorcycle (placed in the wheel chock) to the tie-down anchors need to be such that when the tie-down straps are attached to the motorcycle and the tie-down anchors, the straps are at approximately a 30°- 45° angle. Plan and locate each tie-down anchor in/on the trailer to accomplish this recommended arrangement. If the surface the tie-down anchors are being installed is a wood material always use a backing/reinforcing plate with locking hardware/nuts. Always inspect any tie-down anchors and surrounding mounting surfaces for any signs of material stress, hardware loosening or potential failure.


BLACK+GRAY Ultimax Tie-Down Anchors have been designed, developed, tested and manufactured to provide significant advantages over common tie-down anchors.

  • Ultimax Tie-Down Anchors are high-quality, heavy-duty tie-down hardware for securing motorcycles and other cargo in open or closed trucks and trailers.
  • Unlike off-the shelf, off-shore-manufactured products offered by competitors, Ultimax Tie-Downs Anchors are designed, engineered, tested and manufactured in the USA.
  • All Ultimax Tie-Down Anchors are manufactured of 4130 steel alloy with powdercoat finishes. Select models include 304 stainless steel rings.
  • Six different floor or wall mountable models meet specific anchoring requirements for a variety of motorcycle and trailer types.
  • Ultimax Tie-Down Anchor models provide options for vertical or horizontal mounting, in open or corner applications. Models range from simple one-piece anchors to a unique recessed anchor that rotates 360° without axles or pins.
  • Ultimax Tie-Down Anchors are tested and load-rated at angles of 90°, 45° and 30°. Reinforcement plates are available.
  • Grade 5 installation hardware is provided.